Now that I have finally managed to get my old HDD mounted, it is time to actually start getting my data off, keeping what I want for analysis, formatting the drive, and getting just my data back on.

What's worth keeping? What isn't needed? I tried looking into a few things, but there was very little to really go on. So how do I gather the files I need for analysis, while being able to otherwise keep my data, and reformat the drive?

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My webserver didn't start out as a dedicated webserver. It started off as a bit pf a home server to which we can back some stuff up against. Silly me then went and added webserver capabilities to this. In retrospect that was a rather dumb idea... But you learn from your mistakes, and I certainly have with this.

But now that the hard drive has been pulled (and the server rebuilt), how do I get my data off? In a perfect world with unlimited resources, this is a non-issue. But what to do with only existing resources? A bootable Linux CD/DVD is the first thing to come to mind, but it wound up being less simple than I imagined...

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In my first Network Security post, I think I will rant a bit more than anything really technical, but the technical stuff will come as I get a little more accustomed to this site.

 

While working at Check Point's TAC (Technical Assistance Center), I have seen all kinds of things that, quite frankly, blow me away. Of all the things that do this (trust me, there are surprisingly many), there is one that stands out above the rest: not listening to the first Engineer that was spoken to. As a higher-level engineer, I don't take those front-line calls. I get the case escalated to me if the previous engineer is unable to solve the issue. I can't count the number of times I have merely repeated what the previous engineer has said (sometime word-for-word), and that is indeed the solution to the issue at hand.

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So I have (had, now) a webserver hosting this site at home. Out of the blue, weird things started going on with my server, and I think it's been hijacked to serve another purpose. What purpose? I don't know. By whom? Still no idea. How? Even less of an idea. In the end, I wound up backing up my website (which was strangely left untouched), and rebuilt my server with a new OS and better security, and got my website up and running.

When I rebuilt the server, I used a new hard drive so that I could rebuild my server and get my website back up. The old hard drive is sitting on my desk, waiting to be plugged in for further analysis.

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